Yoga Butterflies As A Teacher

Yoga Butterflies As A Teacher

With your yoga teaching certificate in hand and eagerness at heart, you finally feel ready to take on the yoga world after completing your yoga teacher training! With all the new knowledge you’ve gained over your time at yoga teacher training, you’re keen to bring this knowledge to your local studio(s) and finally put what you’ve learnt to practice. A common occurrence that plagues a lot of new yoga teachers is what I like to call the “Yoga Butterflies”. Nervousness is something that all new yoga teachers are bound to experience. I’m convinced that new teachers who do not get nervous teaching must be some sort of superhuman that Professor X from X-men is awaiting to discover – and of course kudo’s to you if you don’t! Through my experience, it’s become a reality that yoga butterflies are never something that completely go away. Luckily, I’ve discovered a few ways that help me manage the yoga butterflies, which some new yoga teachers will hopefully find helpful! (1) Be Your Own Inspiration I was once told that the best yoga teachers are those who are committed to their own practise. While some may agree or disagree with this, I did find it extremely helpful to take some asana, sequences and sometimes entire routines from my daily yoga practise as inspiration for the yoga class I may be teaching that week or day. By practising the sequences, it helped me figure out what transitions flowed well together, what sequences had a good balance for the body, and it helped me to remember the sequences so I felt like I was less...
What Yoga Teachers Want You to Know

What Yoga Teachers Want You to Know

Going into a public yoga class can be intimidating. Luckily, great yoga teachers can make you feel welcomed even if you might not know know all the poses or philosophy in yoga. Even experienced yoga practioners might wonder what yoga teachers are thinking as they walk around the room. So here’s some insight on what yoga teachers REALLY want you to know!   We’re not concerned if you can’t touch your toes We don’t mind if you can’t touch your toes, or if your hips are tight, or you can’t balance very well. What matters to us is that you practice with an open mind, a soft heart, and you’re not taking things too seriously. So what if you can’t touch your toes? What matters is that you try. Which brings us to the next point… We want you to feel accepted It doesn’t matter if you’ve been coming to yoga for 10 years or this is your first class. We want you to feel welcomed and accepted. We want to give you options, and to not feel bad for taking one option over the other. One of the greatest advancements in a yoga practice is to shift your focus from what other people might think. It’s ok to check out other styles or teachers We understand it’s nice to check out different styles or to be inspired by another teacher. Both curiosities bring other elements to your practice and help you grow in different ways. We also accept that sometimes you “need” that certain style or teacher that particular day, and we’re totally cool with that. You’re welcome...
Anatomy in Yoga

Anatomy in Yoga

An excerpt from the Yogacara Yoga Teacher Training Manual by Emily Kane – studio owner and staff member   An understanding of anatomy is key for the safety and development of your students. Integrating this knowledge can encourage injury prevention and facilitate the healing process. It can connect a deeper understanding of the philosophies in creating yoga sequences for public and private classes. For private classes, if there is a specific area of focus, then you can design a practice that addresses those concerns.  An anatomical awareness also prepares you to take on students with injuries in a safe and effective manner. Using variations, props, and mindful sequencing to compliment this information can create an inclusive yoga class. An understanding of anatomy also gives you the tools to analyze your practice and teachings to create effective movement patterns. This encourages proper sequencing techniques that include adequate warm-ups and poses with appropriate counterposes. It also reinforces the importance of alignment for the purpose of safety for our joints, muscles, tendons and ligaments rather than for an esthetic appeal. The patterns we create on our mat have the ability to affect how we progress outside of yoga, meaning that our muscle memory creates healthy habits to impact other activities in our daily lives. The evolution of yoga suggests that one day it can be utilized for rehabilitation in a clinical setting – perhaps a connection can be made between medical providers and the application of yoga as therapy. This is one of the many reasons anatomy should be part of the curriculum in any yoga teacher training. In teaching yoga, it...
The Journey of Yoga Teacher Training

The Journey of Yoga Teacher Training

Written by Emily Kane – owner of Yogacara Whistler and staff member of the Yogacara Yoga Teacher Training program   I used to think Yoga Teacher Training was out of my grasp. Seeing the respect that yoga teachers had for leading classes with confidence, awareness and grace is what drew me towards yoga teacher training, but life seemed to get in the way. Becoming a yoga teacher was always put on the back burner. When I finally took the leap, it was like I found the place I was always meant to be. I was making a commitment to myself – the start of a lifelong journey. Even if I had decided not to teach public classes, it would still be one of the most important decisions I’ve ever made. So why did it take me so long? There are some common misconceptions about yoga teacher training that could hold someone back from doing what they love. Here’s why anytime’s a great time to start your next journey.   1.) You think you’re not good enough I started practicing yoga just before I turned 15 years old, but it took me years to complete my yoga teacher training. Why? I didn’t think I was good enough. I couldn’t really do anything “crazy,” my warrior II felt like it needed some work, and from time-to-time, I fell out of balancing poses. If you think you need to do EVERY pose, think again. Yoga’s much more than asana (or poses) and just like the lessons we’re taught in class, we’re encouraged to work wherever we’re at in that moment. Honoring your body and...
Yoga Vocabulary

Yoga Vocabulary

By Emily Kane – Studio owner and member of Yogacara Teacher Training staff Yoga Vocabulary As a yoga teacher our vocabulary speaks volumes about our ability to lead with compassion and awareness. There are certain yoga vocabulary and phrases that should be avoided in the context of a yoga class but not everyone is aware of this taboo. 1.)   Push or shove Unfortunately many people still use these words when teaching a class. If you look up this term in the dictionary the synonyms are assault, attack and force – just to name a few. A careful choice of words allows the teacher to embrace Ahimsa – a non-harming principle included inthe moral codes of yoga known as the Yamas.   To read the rest of Yoga Vocabulary, check out the Yogacara Yoga Teacher Training...
The Kundalini Yoga Experience | Yogacara Studios

The Kundalini Yoga Experience | Yogacara Studios

by Janet Ward, E-RYT Lead Teacher 200 Yoga Teacher Training Welcome to the Kundalini Yoga Experience.  It is the year of the Snake, a perfect time to dive deeper into the mystery, magic, meaning and music of Kundalini energy. This bio-electric elemental creative life force energy is in everything. In every person it has its own intelligence, its own unique fingerprint frequency. Kundalini yoga and meditation can connect us deeply to our inner guru.  Yogi Bhajan who brought this technology westward from India in the late sixites was a Sikh and in the Sikh religion there are no more gurus.  The only guru is the Guru Granth Sahib – the holy book of the Sikh religion which contains wisdom from many traditions and is a beautiful testament to peace, love and greatness. When Kundalini is awakened there is an experience of self- knowledge revealing an inner light.  Paradoxically, this experience of light can include a surrender to what Christians call the dark night of the soul. In surrender to this spiritual trial we ultimately find the union, the oneness of Yoga and we become more sensitive, refined and intuitive. There are myriad ways to activate Kundalini energy; Yoga, pranayam, meditation, visualization, chanting, dancing, Shaktipat (the touch of a master) , fasting and other austerities, koans, self-inquiry, sex.  We are fortunate to have techniques to ground the radical experience of Kundalini awakening. As Shakti awakens and enters each chakra she sets it spinning.  Its elements dissolve and she rises up. Chi, Ki, Ruach, Manna, Ache, Elan Vitale, Fuerza Vitale, Holy Spirit, Kung, Kukulkan, Quetzalcoatl – these are all names for the...
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